Liblady's Genealogy Blog


52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History : Week 5 : Favorite Food
January 29, 2011, 7:58 pm
Filed under: 52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History

Week 5: Favorite Food. What was your favorite food from childhood? If it was homemade, who made it? What was in this dish, and why was it your favorite? What is your favorite dish now?

My Favorite food, where do I begin.

When I was in kindergarten, I would get out in time for my father, to go to his coffee klatch at the downtown restaurant. I would get to have a hamburger and fries. This wasn’t a fast food restaurant; it would be considered a greasy spoon.  The Hamburger was nice and juicy, on a toasted bun, and fries were nice and thick, crisp on the outside.  Oh, I was in heaven, even though when I got home I was in trouble, because I wasn’t hungry for the lunch my mother had prepared.

Now one of my favorite meals was my mother’s fried chicken.  We would spend the day dressing chickens, and a fresh one was cooked for supper that night.  It was cooked in Crisco, and the chicken had been dipped and rolled in flour with some salt and pepper, and it was cooked in a cast iron skillet.  The chickens were home grown, and it was fresh meat.  There is not much to compare with a freshly dressed chicken, fried up with a crisp skin.  Of course we had mashed potatoes and “white” gravy with the chicken.  It was finger licking good. The leftovers, if there we any, were just as good the next day.

Even today when I fix a chicken, especially to fry, I want to start with a whole chicken so I can cut it up the way my mother taught me.  She also had a very specific way to put the pieces in the pan, and it always fit.

Now for school lunch, I always enjoyed the days they fixed goulash, with peas, a fresh baked roll, and apple crisp, and of course a glass of milk. We had a machine that dispensed the milk; we did not have cartons. That was always my favorite school lunch. I still think goulash and apple crisp go well together, and I want frozen peas, not canned peas.

At school for many years we had a cook who would bring treats to the teacher’s workroom.  Her special treat was her Nubbins.  It was pieces of bread dough, with cinnamon and sugar, and topped with frosting.  When it was fresh out of the oven, it was so warm and ooey-gooey good, and melt in your mouth.  The pan didn’t last long at all.  A few years back I was visiting with her and told how much I missed, her Nubbins, and found out it was the little pieces of dough left after rolling the dough around her pigs in a blanket.  After she retired her nubbins were still talked about they were sooooo good!

Today, I enjoy a variety of foods; I cannot say I have just one favorite.  It depends on what is available.  Although, I always enjoy a nice juicy, cold slice of watermelon in the summer.

52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History by Amy Coffin, of the We Tree blog, is a series of weekly blogging prompts (one for each week of 2011) that invite genealogists and others to record memories and insights about their own lives for future descendants. You do not have to be a blogger to participate. If you do not have a genealogy blog, write down your memories on your computer, or simply record them on paper and keep them with your files.

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2 Comments so far
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To me, the greasy spoon was a major step up over today’s fast food. I know it was called “greasy” for a reason, but still the food was less processed, less chemicals, and, in my opinion, it had more taste.

Comment by Free Genealogy Guide

I totally agree.

Comment by liblady495




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